etymology - Why do we say that the most chosen part is the "flower and cream"? - Spanish Language Stack Exchange

etymology - Why do we say that the most chosen part is the

etymology - Why do we say that the most chosen part is the "flower and cream"? - Spanish Language Stack Exchange

Who has not heard a phrase like:

At that meeting there was the flower and cream of society: kings, ministers, judges. Basically, we refer to the set of population that represents the supreme value (read in terms of money and / or power).

I read that in Don Quixote now it opens. In addition, the RAE collects it in:

flower Del lat. flos, floris. flower and cream 1. f. flower (‖ most chosen). The flower of the society.

And, I think without apparent relation:

7. F.

Maybe from natta, var. b. lat. matta 'manta' (...) 3. f. Therefore, it seems as if both flower and cream refer to something distinguished, so to say flower and cream would be something like the good and the better : a reiteration to give more power to the described. I'm right? Is there any further explanation?

By the way, in Fundéu it is written in "Should you write crème de la crème in italics? Just the word crème or do we include the feminine article?:

The expression made is crème de la crème . It is written in italics in its entirety (although it precedes an article, it is round, since it is not part of it) and respecting the accents of the French. It can also be replaced by its Spanish equivalent of flower and cream , but lacks the ironic sense with which the French expression is sometimes used.

Curious! It seems that crème de la crème may have an ironic sense.

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