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Small worms called nematodes do not move randomly across the ground, but instead use electric fields to orient themselves, a group led by entomologist David Shapiro-Ilan and plant pathologist Clive Bock discovered that the nematode Steinernema carpocapsae was attracted to the plant.

by an electric current applied on an agar plate. Based on these results, scientists concluded that worms rely on electricity, or electric fields, to orient themselves on the ground. Scientists think that nematodes also use magnetic fields in the same way.

Researchers with the SIA have discovered that entomopathogenic nematodes that kill insects typically move in a group, similar to group behavior of other animals such as fish or wolves. This behavior could contribute to the unequal distribution of populations of these nematodes in agricultural fields. Scientists tested their theory related to magnetic fields by placing magnets on opposite sides of a plaque. agar containing the S nematodes. carpocapsae . One magnet was oriented toward the North Pole, and another toward the South Pole. The group noticed a directional reaction by the nematodes, with a higher number of them moving towards the South Pole. This motion in reaction to the magnetic fields - called magnetoreception - may be important in facilitating or increasing the ability of various organisms to find food. The results of this research have been published in the 'International Journal for Parasitology'.

Based on these findings, the researchers say that group movement behavior may contribute to an unequal distribution of natural or applied populations of entomopathogenic nematodes in agricultural fields. Scientists also published these findings in the International Journal for Parasitology. These studies have implications for a better understanding of the behavior of nematodes by searching for food and for improving the tactics of methods of natural control of insect pests. Knowledge of how and why beneficial nematodes found their prey is an essential factor in using these nematodes in future biological control programs for insect pests.

Source: Agricultural Research Service. SIAUSDA.

PINION CRUSHED.
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