Converted Benches In Playgrounds, Reach Downtown Long Beach | Privacy Policy | gazettes.com

Converted Benches In Playgrounds, Reach Downtown Long Beach | Privacy Policy | gazettes.com

Converted Benches In Playgrounds, Reach Downtown Long Beach | Privacy Policy | gazettes.com

Long Beach town center is getting the sidewalk treated as a dining room.

Hamburger Mary's unveiled the first "parklet" patio for dining in July sidewalk or park reserved for recreation or beautification, in that case for dinner) of Pine Avenue, with a private official ribbon cut this Friday. And, three other downtown restaurants - Ahimsa Vegan Cafe, District Wine and The Green House - are now in the process of doing the same. Parklets are essentially extensions of customizable banquettes or raised terraces, which are located on the street and are aligned flush with the sidewalk. Typically there are potted plants and other obstacles placed around it to make the space feel closed.

"An important part of creating a more pleasing pedestrian center is to provide opportunities for people to sit down and "said Sean Warner via e-mail, Director of Production of Associated Places for Downtown Long Beach Associates. "Parklets, whether public or private, increase those opportunities and help generate activity along the streets.This is particularly important for Pine Avenue north of Third Street where there are a few courtyards with dining rooms. He added that the "parklet" at Hamburger Mary's acts as a natural attraction for more traffic on foot near 330 Pine Ave., which could translate into more clientele in other businesses along the street.

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"The" parklet "is giving us more visibility," Warner said. "The community seems happy to be there, and it has a fun image and it's a great place to come and dine and have a drink and hang out, be it at night or during brunch or lunch."

Warner also noted that the new "parklet" used part of a curved curb space so it only occupies a full parking spot, which officials say they believe will generate more tax dollars for the city than a measured parking space could.

In District Wine, owners Angela Mesna and Mark Dunton say they are waiting for the addition of their new "parklet" in the coming weeks. It is being built off-site and will occupy a parking space-but Dunton said they were able to add parking in the area doing some overhaul of traffic lines on the sidewalk.

With small square feet inside and growing customer demand, Dunton said the business needed to expand. He and his wife considered relocating to a different part of the city or even another city, but they decided that parklet was the best way forward.

Enrique Almeida
Enrique Almeida @ealmeida

"We called our restaurant our living room, so if this is the living room then that's going to be the terrace, "Dunton said of the" parklet. " "It will look like a backyard, with a high top bar around the edge and then seating in the middle. We want to use it all year round and do some fun events there.

Parklets, which became a trend first in other cities, including San Francisco, have been gaining popularity in Long Beach since the first parklet was created. At Last Café, Berlin, Number Nine, Utopia and others have already developed their own versions.

Those designed by City Fabrick cost between $ 16,000 and $ 35,000, depending on the size and complexity of the design, Ulaszweski said. Usually, business owners have worked with city traffic engineers to mitigate any negative impacts of transforming a public parking space into a private backyard.

"In general, we are providing one creative capacity for those who do not have enough space, and we are improving the community, "said Ulaszweski. "We want to improve the pedestrian environment with these parklets and share this design with other members of the community, and we are very pleased to see the growing interest in the city."

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