IV North American Ornithological Conference

IV North American Ornithological Conference

IV North American Ornithological Conference

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Thomas, N, E, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, USA, Nathan.Thomas@usd.edu
Swanson, D, L, University of South Dakota , Vermillion, USA, David.Swanson@usd.edu

MACRO- AND MICROHABITAT SELECTION OF SHOREBIRDS DURING STOPOVER IN THE MID-CONTINENT OF THE UNITED STATES

The availability and quality of stopover sites can influence shorebird use and diversity. Previous studies have demonstrated that shorebirds do not use habitats in proportion to their availability. We investigated the macro- and microhabitat use of shorebirds migrating through the mid-continental prairie pothole region of the United States. During fall sampling seasons of 2002-2005, we observed 29 species of shorebirds from 9 different foraging guilds. The majority of shorebirds used mudflat macrohabitat (& gt; 98%) and selected this habitat disproportionately to availability (P <0.01). Shorebirds also demonstrated a preference for wet mud (40%) and water (51%) over dirt (9%), with no significant differences between natural and managed wetlands. Small shorebirds accounted for the largest proportion of birds, comprising 90% of the community in managed wetlands and 87% in natural sites. At natural sites there was a significant positive relationship (P <0.05) between wet mud (mudflat) available and shorebird abundance. At managed sites a non-significant negative trend (P = 0.08) between water level and shorebird abundance was found, but this was variable between years due to vegetation changes. This study demonstrated similar shorebird habitat associations between natural and managed sites, but water levels and mudflat availability can influence shorebird abundance and diversity.

MACRO SELECTION AND MICRO-HABITAT OF BIRDS BEACH DURING THEIR STOPS IN THE CENTER OF THE UNITED STATES

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      Thomas N, USA, Nathan.Thomas@usd.edu
      Swanson, D, L, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, USA, David.Swanson@usd.edu

      MACRO- AND MICROHABITAT SELECTION OF SHOREBIRDS DURING STOPOVER IN THE MID-CONTINENT OF THE UNITED STATES

      The availability and quality of resting sites can influence the use and diversity of shorebirds. Previous studies have shown that shorebirds do not use habitats in proportion to their availability. We investigate shorebirds' use of macro and microhabitat as they migrate through the prairie region of the United States. During the sampling seasons from 2002 to 2005 we observed 29 species of shorebirds from nine different trophic guilds. Most shorebirds use the macrobug habitat (> 98%) and selected this habitat without regard to availability (P <0.01). The shorebirds also showed a preference for areas with mud (40%) and water (51%) on dust (9%), with no significant differences between natural and managed wetlands. The small beach communities made up the largest proportion of birds, making up 90% of the community in managed wetlands and 87% in natural sites. At the natural sites, there was a significant positive relationship (P <0.05) between available wet marshes and beach abundance. In managed sites, a non-significant negative trend (P = 0.08) was found between water level and beach abundance, but this varied over the years due to changes in vegetation. This study demonstrated habitat associations between natural and managed sites, but water levels and water availability may influence the abundance and diversity of beachers.

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