Immigrants of voluntary permanence - Birds Blog

One of the most important approaches to EFTA is the study, monitoring and education about shorebirds. These are birds that notoriously embark on migration trips from their birthplace in Alaska to southern America where they spend the summer. They do this in order to accommodate themselves in places where resources will be abundant for their survival; with enough water, food, shelters and space to spend the summer.

However, shorebirds are not the only species undertaken by this demanding traverse, there are also other migrating groups such as waterfowl (ducks, geese and swans). Most species of ducks and geese reproduce in the northern states of the United States and Canada. One can see these birds in abundance during the winter in the states of Oregon and California. But as soon as the climate begins to change these birds begin to migrate to the places where they will reproduce.

If these birds migrate and fly north in the summer, how come we can still find some of them in parks, lakes and wetlands here in Oregon and California during those months. The photograph attached to this column is from a pair of Canadian barnacles and was taken at Davis California during August of last year.

August? But if that's mid-summer, should not they have left already? What did the other geese have left behind, and now these few who stayed here must find a way to survive in this hot, dry climate? Moreover, a couple of weeks after I took this photograph, the babies of the geese began to go out and swim with their parents. It seems that they had stayed here on purpose instead of following everyone else to Canada where they will build their nests.

That answers many questions because since I started birding in early February of this year I have noticed a considerable reduction in the number of water birds in my study sites. In the beginning there were hundreds of them and little by little as the summer is approaching, the numbers are getting smaller and smaller. However, those pairs of geese that I encounter daily on the grasslands are still there and it seems they have no plans to move. They are immigrants who have managed to locate in this place and who came to stay to give life to this place that has been almost empty after the other birds are gone.

One of the most important goals of EFTA is to study, monitor and educate about shorebirds. These are birds that notoriously undertake journeys of migration from their place of birth in Alaska to South America where they spend the summer. They do this in order to settle in places where resources are abundant to survive; with enough water, food, shelter and space to be able to spend the summer.

However, shorebirds are not the only species who undertake this journey; there are other groups that also migrate such as Waterfowl (ducks, geese and swans). Most of the species of ducks and geese breed in the States of the northern United States and Canada. One can see these birds in abundance during the winter in the States of Oregon and California. If these birds migrate and fly North in the summer, why is it that they still can find some of them in parks, lakes, and lakes.

wetlands here in Oregon and California during those months? The picture attached to this blog is of a couple of Canada Geese and it was taken at Davis California during August of last year.

It turns out that unlike ducks, geese develop very strong bonds with their partner that can even extend permanently or until one of them dies. Many geese find good habitat in their wintering grounds that they do not have to migrate and once they find their mate, they have everything they need to breed.

That answers many questions because since I started birding at the beginning of February of this year I have noticed a considerable reduction in the number of waterfowl that are in my study places. At the beginning there are hundreds of them and little by little as the summer draws near, the numbers are becoming increasingly smaller. However, those pairs of geese which I encounter daily on the grasslands are still there and they seem to have no plans to move. They are immigrants that have managed to locate here and who came to stay to give life to this place that has been almost empty when other birds left.

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