Roberto Vazquez (Pacific Gallery)

It would be hard to notice the Mexican artist Roberto Vazquez if you were to encounter him walking around Puerto Vallarta. In addition to being a strikingly handsome man, the 46 year old bearded six footer with hair to the middle of his back and stone and ivory cones in his ear lobes is almost always accompanied by the two biggest of his three Mexican hairless dogs, Xoloscuintles, named Frida (as in Kahlo) and Culli, Nahual (language of the Aztecs) word referring to a sad or troubled face. However, the paintings of this extremely talented painter are equally striking as his own personage, and his increased use of bright colors such as orange, pink and purple in his most recent series of paintings make them seem even more so. His previous work was more subdued and in earth tones, but upon recently curing a long term eye the brighter colors appeared as a natural progression. Vazquez also attributes his move to the tropical light of Vallarta from the smoggier conditions in Guadalajara as an influence in his follows towards more colorful imagery. Another change that has occurred over the years is that their figures have become more slender from their beginnings, to the point where some of the human bodies are approaching the look of stick figures with muscles.

It would be hard not to notice Mexican artist Roberto Vazquez if he met him walking around Puerto Vallarta. In addition to being a handsome and simply handsome man, the 46-year-old artist with a beard and six feet tall, with hair in the middle of his back and stone and ivory cones in the lobes of his ears is almost always accompanied by the two largest of his three dogs Xoloscuintle, called Frida (as in Kahlo) and Culli, which in Nahuatl (Aztec language) is a word that refers to a sad or troubled face. However, the paintings of this talented painter are just as striking, as his own person, and his increased use of bright colors like orange, pink and purple in his most recent series of paintings makes them look even more. His previous work was fainter and earthy, but after a long-term eye condition had been treated, the brighter colors appeared as a natural progression. Vázquez also attributes his transfer to the Puerto Vallarta tropical light of smog conditions in Guadalajara as an influence on his journey towards more colorful images. Another change that has occurred in recent years is that their figures have become thinner since their beginnings, when they were more plump, to the point that some of the human bodies resemble the look of stick figures with muscles.

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