The Sting Factor - UC Berkeley Urban Bee Lab

The Sting Factor - UC Berkeley Urban Bee Lab

The Sting Factor - UC Berkeley Urban Bee Lab

Planta de los Jardines
Planta de los Jardines

The Sting Factor

A pair of mating Habropoda quickly.

are fascinating and important creatures. However, they have a feature that is not so appealing to humans: it stings! The best strategy to avoid bee stings while still enjoying the many benefits that result from having bees in your yard is to simply know a little about where the bees are and what they are doing. early enough, sometimes it is possible to see male anthophorides with stripes and long reddish-brown antennae sleeping on the flowers of CosmosBipinnatus. Later in the day, the most popular flowers of bees will be covered with the territorial male bees flying from one side to another, loading and approaching other bees and pushing them out of the flowers in a constant battle for dominance. It is difficult to imagine the nerve of some of the smaller bees, which attack the bees three times their size - especially since their threatening gestures are all a facade. Despite their aggressive behavior from time to time, male bees of all species are stingless. One way to distinguish females from males is that, on a good day, females have legs, head or belly - depending on the species - covered with bright spots of yellow, purple or white pollen. Women spend most of their time shimmying through pollen and drinking nectar from their favorite flowers, while males are frequently attending other businesses.

A Yellow-Faced Bumble bee crawling up a researcher's arm.

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