Alcohol linked to increased risk of perennial allergic rhinitis

Alcohol linked to increased risk of perennial allergic rhinitis

Alcohol linked to increased risk of perennial allergic rhinitis

The study, published in the July application of Clinical and Experimental Allergy, found that the risk increased by 3% for each additional alcoholic drink per week. In contrast, the authors did not observe any increase in the risk of seasonal allergic rhinitis depending on alcohol intake.

Allergic rhinitis (RA) is a upper respiratory disorder affecting between 10% and 40% the population throughout the world, and over the past decades, the incidence of RA has increased in Westernized countries. Alcohol consumption is part of the Western way of life and it has been proposed that alcohol consumption may be one of the factors contributing to the rise in RA, especially since alcohol is a well-known trigger of reactions and there is evidence of which hypersensitivity influences the immune system.

Aged 5,870 women studied 20-29 years old and free from seasonal and perennial allergic rhinitis at baseline. They were asked about different lifestyle habits including their general alcohol intake, measured in drinks per week (ie wine glasses, beer bottles). After a period of seven to nine years, women were contacted again and 831 women had developed to RA and 523 had developed perennial RA women, 14% and 9% respectively. The authors noted that a general trend that the more alcohol the women reported they drank, the higher their risk of developing perennial allergic rhinitis. For example, women who reported drinking more than 14 drinks a week were 78% more likely to develop perennial allergic rhinitis than women who had reported drinking less than one drink a week.

"Another interesting finding of this study was that smokers were found to have a decreased risk of seasonal RA, with no change to the risk of perennial RA," he told Tolstrup. "We also found that if one or both parents had asthma, the participant was more likely to have perennial RA and this was exacerbated in women who drank over 14 drinks a week."

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