History / History

History / History

History / History

History of El Verano School

By Nicholas Brignoli

Back in 1912 The Summer Grammar School was located on the corner of Grand Ave (currently named Arnold Dr.) and Verano Ave. The school was a small, four room building. Three of the rooms were used in the classrooms for grades 1 through 8. The fourth room was used as a basketball court as well as a place for the children to hang their coats and lunches. There were 2 teachers and 1 principal. On top of the school was a bell that was used to signal the children that school had begun. Around 1915 my great grandfather, Herbert Ammann and his schoolmate Henry Locaenini, were messing around and knocked the bell out of its support and cracked the bell. During the early 1950's the student enrollment had grown to 150 with only 5 teachers. It was a good thing that Henry's dad was the local blacksmith and was able to repair the bell.

The need for a larger school was imminent. In September 1953, on land that was once Mr. Kearney's tomato fields, the "new" The Summer Grammar School was opened on Riverside Dr. The old school bell was brought to the new school and is still there today. The cost to build the new school was $ 230,000. There were 281 students in grades kindergarten through 8 enrolled. The new school featured a cafeteria that offered homemade food that was served on plastic trays with plastic dishes and real silverware. The cost of a hot lunch was 25 ¢. The school colors were dark green with dark pink doors. When the school first opened there were only 2 wings of classrooms and in 1956 a third row of classrooms were added.

Through the years, El Verano Grammar School has grown and changed. In 2008 the preschool class was added. The 2013-2014 school year, El Verano School had 491 children ranging from preschool to 5 grade. The play structures now share the playground with solar panels. The Summer School mascot is still the Mustangs and the school colors are now green and white. Currently the school offers a variety of after school enrichment classes: whether it be singing, karate, fitness, chess, or poetry there is something for everyone's interests. There is a Garden Club where students learn about how to grow and maintain a garden. The school now even has its own student orchestra, Valley Vibes which preforms all over the valley.

This is my last year at El Verano School before going on to middle school. I have had a really good time at El Verano. I am especially grateful for the great bonds I have built with all my teachers, the staff and fellow classmates. I am sure even when I'm in college, I will still remember The Summer Elementary School and the great times I had.

History of the Summer School

By Nicholas Brignoli < / p>

In the early 1950s student enrollment had grown to 150 students with only 5 teachers. The need for a larger school was imminent. In September 1953, on the land that was once Tom Kearney's tomato plantations, the "new" school of El Verano Grammar was opened in Riverside Dr. The old school bell was brought to the new school and still is there today. The cost to build the new school was $ 230,000. There were 281 students in grades K-8. The new school had a cafeteria that offered homemade food and was served in plastic trays with plastic plates and real utensils. The cost of a hot lunch was 0.25 ¢. The colors of the school were dark green with dark pink doors. When the school opened for the first time there were only 2 sections of classrooms and in 1956 a third section of classrooms was added. My grandfather, Paul Ammann, went to El Verano School in the late 1950s. At that time, the school had its own baseball team in which he played and a basketball team that played against other schools in the area. Ms. Paula Aja, a retired teacher at El Verano School and a former El Verano student, remembers when she was enrolled at the school, one of the major fundraising events was the annual Thanksgiving meal sponsored by the school. From the sale of tickets to the creation of individual tablecloths, serving, and cleaning, all students participated. It was very important in the community. Thanksgiving annual meals at El Verano School continued until the 1980s when my mom and uncle attended school.

This is my senior year at El Verano School before moving on to high school. I really enjoyed myself in El Verano. I am especially grateful for the great ties I have built with all my teachers, staff and classmates. I am sure that when I am in college, I will still remember El Verano Elementary School and the great times I spend here.

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